Hospitality, The Rails, Nothing, Fear of Men, Amen Dunes, Mark Mulcahy, Palehound, Slothrust, Betty Who, Simon Raymonde (DJ set), Dapking DJs, Deano Sounds

Record Store Day

Hospitality, The Rails, Nothing, Fear of Men, Amen Dunes, Mark Mulcahy, Palehound, Slothrust, Betty Who, Simon Raymonde (DJ set), Dapking DJs, Deano Sounds

Sat, April 19, 2014

Doors: 12:00 pm / Show: 1:00 pm

Rough Trade NYC

Brooklyn, NY

Free

Hospitality
Hospitality
The first thing you might notice about Hospitality’s sophomore album Trouble is what you don’t hear. The process of completing Trouble was, for the band, one of learning to accept silence, to let that empty space exist no matter what it might awaken or evoke. You could catch glimpses of these dark and unexplored places in the margins of Hospitality’s 2012 self-titled debut, but they are at the very heart of Trouble. If you listen closely, you can hear a band pushing against their own boundaries and limitations until they find the very air around them subtly but perceptibly changed.

The trio of Amber Papini (guitar, vocals), Brian Betancourt (bass), and Nathan Michel (drums) approach Trouble with the force and unity of a well-rehearsed touring rock band. They supplement their performances with strategically placed strings, synthesizers, and drum machines. But silence is an inescapable force on Trouble, an invisible fourth player that draws you into the unexplored corners of familiar sounds: the full, ghostly decay of a reverb tail, the round pluck of a bass string, the exact syllables where a doubled vocal line diverges.

In its lyrics and its musical construction, Trouble is an album that wonders about the mysteries that lurk just beyond our field of vision. Slyly and sympathetically, Papini ponders a Saturday afternoon fishing trip as a wrenching interplay of life and death, the perfect blue sky at an air show as a setting for a soured romance. Papini elaborates: “Most of the songs are about everyday environments that arouse anxiety or unease. The ocean isn’t meant for people; we aren’t supposed to be there, and some of the animals that live there are much bigger and faster than we are in the water. I think a lot of the songs deal with this ‘out of place’ kind of theme, feelings of unease and the questions of what is under you or what surrounds you.”

Trouble creates a space where conflicting sentiments and experiences are given room to coexist, where small and seemingly mundane observations pose big questions that hang in the air, unanswered and unanswerable. With a title referencing the artist’s endless struggle in the battle between creativity and outside forces, Trouble also explores the universal themes of loss, love, and loneliness with Papini’s trademark wit. Lines like “And if I’m lost and low / And need you / I’ll disconnect the line” from “Inauguration” somehow make the ultimate kiss-off seem charming, while nature makes clear the loneliness felt when leaving someone you love behind in these lines from “I Miss Your Bones”: “And all the stars will / Twinkle in the midst of a sea / Of black and lonely /An everlasting loss lack abyss.”

It’s fitting that the album was hashed out in band practices that blurred the boundaries between work and leisure, darkness and light, creative collaboration and friendship. Foregoing the usual nighttime hours kept by musicians, the band chose to work on these songs during daily morning rehearsals that proved in many ways more demanding than characteristically relaxed nighttime gatherings. Through these sessions, the band sought to take their music as far as they possibly could as a three-piece, to make sure that every small gesture fell into place and played a vital role in constructing the shape and feel of the songs.

The band carried this daylight-infused clearheadedness with them into the studio with chief arranger Nathan Michel and engineer Matt Boynton acting as co-producers. Nathan describes the process: “We really wanted to avoid the ornamental, but I always like to add more sounds. Matt was helpful in keeping the arrangements as simple and direct as possible. We all wanted the record to have a warm and open sound.” When put to tape, some of the songs for Trouble worked better than expected as fierce and focused trio performances, while others called for more substantial reimaginings. “I Miss Your Bones” emerged almost entirely from a live performance, while “Inauguration” found the band ripping apart their live arrangement and reconstructing the song with drum machines and synthesizers.


The album unfolds like a walk on the beach or a journey to a place you didn’t know you were going. Perhaps a darker sound overall, but Trouble begins with the trademark Hospitality pop then unfurls to reward the listener with the more expansive stripped-down instrumentation of side B. And here, again, is that distinctively present silence, creating a space where an undulating synthesizer feels as alive and mysterious as a single voice in a room.
The Rails
The Rails
The Rails are running. English singer-songwriter duo Kami Thompson and James Walbourne have reached deep into their rich musical histories to concoct the kind of sharp, true folk rock blend rarely heard since the Seventies. Produced with indie legend Edwyn Collins and featuring folk frontierswoman Eliza Carthy on fiddle, The Rails debut album Fair Warning is a little wonder, packed with traditional and original songs that stand outside of time yet resonate with contemporary urgency. Recognising perfection when they hear it, Island records have revived their vintage Pink Label for the duo, home to John Martyn, Nick Drake and Fairport Convention.

“There is something about folk as an ideal that we were reaching towards,” says Kami. “Music by the people, for the people. Songs so icky, and potent, and heart wrenching, they could have been written five hundred years or ten minutes ago, it doesn’t matter.”
“We wanted something almost simplistic,” says James. “Singing, fiddle, electric guitar, no tricks. You can hear everything, it’s bare. It’s hard to convince people to make a record like that now but the sound is fantastic, it’s so direct.”

James, a teenage prodigy with a fascination for early rock ‘n’ roll and roots Americana, is now one of the hottest rock guitarists in Britain. Cult singer-songwriter Peter Bruntnell took him to the US to make an album and James went on to play as a member of such Americana icons as Son Volt and The Pernice Brothers and record with the legendary Jerry Lee Lewis.

Back in the UK, he has played with Ray Davies, become part of the touring line up for The Pogues and joined The Pretenders as lead guitarist in 2008. In 2011, he made his first solo album, The Hill, for Heavenly records. Author and fan Nick Hornby described his guitar playing as “an unearthly cross between James Burton, Peter Green and Richard Thompson” and enthused “Walbourne’s fluid, tasteful, beautiful solos drop the jaw, stop the heart, and smack the gob, all at the same time."

It was Hornby who introduced James to folk siren Linda Thompson, and James first met Kami when they both worked on Linda’s 2007 album Versatile Heart. “We hit it off on a musical level straight away but it took a long time to take that any further,” he reports.
Kami is the youngest daughter of Richard and Linda Thompson, the first couple of Seventies folk rock. She has been a backing singer with Linda, performed with members of the Wainwright family, toured with Sean Lennon and Bonnie Prince Billy and released her own solo album, Love Lies, on Warner Music in 2011.

“I suppose this was the music that was formative to me, but at the same time Folk was a box I didn’t want to be in, and I did my best to avoid it,” she admits. “In folk music, people love the idea of family. When a son or daughter picks up a guitar it’s like the legacy continues. In rock, it’s considered slightly nepotistic. They aren’t easy relationships and it’s difficult for me to talk about, so I think it’s better if I just don’t. I am a musician, and this is the music that was around me growing up, just as it was for many others, and I need to find my own way through it.”

Kami and James have been working together since 2011, romance blooming alongside their music. They married in 2012. “The less said about that the better,” says Kami. “Our long term goal is to make the perfect divorce album, obviously.”

‘Fair Warning’, their debut album, is produced by The Rails with Edwyn Collins and Sebastian Lewsley at West Heath studio, in North London. “They usually do more punky stuff there, so this was a bit different,” notes James. “It’s all analogue, old mics, the sound that comes out of that studio is really direct.” Cody Dickinson (Mississippi Allstars) was recruited to play drums, the great Danny Williams (Black Grape) played bass, Eliza Carthy added fiddle to a couple of tracks but mostly it was James and Kami.

Most of the songs on ‘Fair Warning’ are Walbourne / Thompson originals but the process started with visits to Cecil House, as so many artists have done before, to seek out lost treasures from the world famous folk archive. “We picked songs that we felt could have been written right now,” explains Kami. “‘Bonnie Portmore’ taps into our sense of endangered nature and fears about the planet. And ‘William Taylor’ is the ultimate bitch revenge fantasy for every guy you’ve had a shit time from. Those old murder ballads are my favourite songs ever, they give you permission to say something you’re not allowed to say in real life: I’d really like to kill you for fucking someone else.”

“It’s quite therapeutic,” adds James, wryly. “My folk music is really ’56 Elvis, that’s where I come from. I was introduced to Harry Smith’s Anthology of American Folk Music at an impressionable age, bands like Son Volt taught me a lot of American old time folk ballads, and they are all rooted in the old English and Irish ones, as I found out spending time with Shane McGowan and even Chrissie Hynde, she knows all this stuff. Who is to say what is folk anymore? These are our own songs but written with a certain sound and attitude that connects to music that came before.”

“Folk changed forever when we moved into a world of recorded music but the essence remains the same,” according to Kami. “To me the purpose of music is to feel the feeling multiplied by ten and get it out and have an emotional moment, be sad, cry, laugh, be angry. You make it so other people might feel the same way.”
Nothing
Nothing
Nothing was formed in 2011 by Domenic Palermo. Previously Palermo was the brains behind the early 2000′s hardcore/punk act Horror Show. in 2002 Horror Show was put on hold after Palermo was incarcerated for a stabbing that eventually led to a 2 year prison sentence. Upon his return Palermo would take a lengthy hiatus from music. In 2011 Palermo released a demo tape titled “Poshlost” under the moniker Nothing.

After several attempts at constructing a solid lineup for the band Palermo met Brandon Setta. Setta would bring a lush, rich soundscape and a fresh approach to Palermo’s vision for Nothing. Setta and Palermo would handle the writing for the next release, a very rare 12″ EP that was released on Japanese boutique label Big Love Records called Suns And Lovers(A play off of the D.H. Lawernce book). It was limited to 300 copies and the bands share was donated back to the label for a Tsunami Relief Charity. The next release, Downward Years To Come was a 5 song EP and was recorded at the Rubber Tracks Studio in Brooklyn with Kyle “Slick” Johnson. The record was released by Baltimore Label A389 Records in November 2012. Written by Palermo and Setta, the concept behind Downward Years To Come was a dedication to several different poets who had taken their own lives. Setta and Palermo would again head into the studio, this time with Jeff Zeigler at Uniform Recordings to write their debut LP, Guilty Of Everything and sign with Relapse Records.
Fear of Men
Fear of Men
Fear of Men, born of an art school project, has turned into one of the most promising bands of 2013. Drawing their inspiration from art and philosophy, Fear of Men deliberately juxtaposes iconic museum imagery and lyrical themes of loneliness and fragmentation with buoyant pop melodies.

While studying for a Fine Art & History of Art degree, Jessica Weiss (vocals + guitar) was exhibiting some of her home recordings of ambient soundtracks to short films when these recordings caught the attention of Daniel Falvey (guitar). The two began swapping mix tapes and started a friendship based on a shared love of melody and an eclectic mix of artists such as The Chills, Grouper, Neutral Milk Hotel, The Magnetic Fields, and The Byrds, ultimately leading to the start of a more pop-focused project which they called Fear of Men.

Starting out, the duo recorded their music on a 4-track and transferred it onto their laptops, which Jess would then use as part of her degree work. They uploaded their songs to bandcamp which immediately caught the attention of UK blogs. Enlisting the help of friends to play drums and bass, Fear of Men approached DIY promoters and immediately began playing live shows.

Fear of Men, completed by Michael Miles (drums) and Robyn Edwards (bass), began releasing singles on DIY and independent UK labels and capturing the attention of Pitchfork, NME, Gorilla vs. Bear, Stereogum, The Fader, Drowned in Sound and topping the Hype Machine charts. For a wider introduction into North America, Fear of Men is releasing "Early Fragments" (February 12, 2013 on Kanine Records) a reverse chronological collection of their previous single releases, many of which were only available in Europe on limited edition 7" and cassette pressings.

Fans of Broadcast and Julie Doiron will instantly gravitate toward Jess' tender vocals and melodies. The songs are beguilingly sweet while the lyrics are often bleakly nihilistic, meaning that you'll find yourself singing along to these intelligent, well-crafted pop songs while unwittingly sinking deeper into Fear of Men's world.
Amen Dunes
Amen Dunes
Amen Dunes, the project of Damon McMahon, was born out of a collection of
songs made in the fall of 2006 in upstate New York. They were personal recordings not intended for release, a cathartic answer to the music, people, and life in New York City. After sharing them with a few friends, the tapes were shelved, and the following summer McMahon moved to China and all but quit making music. He would live in Beijing for the next few years, writing and recording only occasionally with no clear intention to return to New York.

While McMahon was in Beijing the tapes found their way to Locust Music in
Chicago who championed their release, and after two years of deliberation, the recordings emerged as D.I.A. in the spring of 2009. The record was met with unexpected admiration among critics in the musical underground, prompting McMahon to move home to New York that summer. He began to perform live in the US and Europe, playing with a rotating cast of musicians.

In July 2010 McMahon released his first record on Sacred Bones, the EP Murder
Dull Mind, a set of recordings tracked in his Beijing apartment. Then, in January 2011, he spent a month recording a collection of songs in New York City that would be his first proper recording in almost five years, released that August on Sacred Bones as the Through Donkey Jaw LP. Where Murder Dull Mind was sparse, acoustic and almost all first-take improvisation, Through Donkey Jaw contained more fully realized sounds and songs; its tone very much the winter to Murder Dull Mind’s summer. In the two years following Through Donkey Jaw, McMahon toured the US and Europe and self-released a few limited edition experimental recordings on his imprint Perfect Lives. The Ethio Covers 7” was a set of downer covers of Ethiopian music and the Spoiler LP was a collection of experimental pieces.

Early in 2013, McMahon turned to focus on his most ambitious project yet. Where the previous Amen Dunes records had all been largely improvisational first-take affairs, recorded in a matter of weeks at most, the forthcoming full-length, Love, is the product of close to a year and a half of continuous work. As he began to flesh out the new material, he found himself guided by the work of classic American singers and songs more strongly than on any previous Amen Dunes record. And unlike the earlier recordings of McMahon’s which were almost always a solo affair, the music on Love was performed by a variety of musicians, centered around the core trio and symbiotic interplay of McMahon, Jordi Wheeler on guitar and piano, and Parker Kindred on drums (both longstanding collaborators of Damon’s).

Eager to capture a musical feeling outside the confines of New York City,
McMahon chose to hold the main recording sessions in Montreal with Dave Bryant and Efrim Menuck of Godspeed You! Black Emperor. In addition to recording the sessions that McMahon produced, members of Godspeed also played on several of the songs, along with Colin Stetson on saxophone and several other Montreal musicians. The remainder of the recordings took place back in Brooklyn at Strange Weather and Trout Recording, and featured additional performances by a handful of musicians, including Elias Bender-Ronnenfelt of Iceage, who duets with McMahon on “Green Eyes.” Amen Dunes has always been rooted in traditional song and sound, but Love is his first work in which this so clearly shines through. The guiding influence of Astral Weeks, Sam Cooke, Tim Hardin, Marvin Gaye, Hector Lavoe, and the cosmic non-verbal mediations of Leon Thomas, all kept vigil over the songwriting of Love, and the spirit of late 60’s/early 70’s spiritual jazz of Pharaoh Sanders and Alice Coltrane channeled the sound. The result is simply the most substantial Amen Dunes record to date. These are elemental songs about time, love and memory, as much about the listener as they are about the writer: pure, open, and beautiful.
Milagres
Milagres
Audible fireworks explode in the distance of the opening moments of Milagres second album, the aptly titled, Violent Light. It is essentially elemental, as vocalist Kyle Wilson descends on lead track, “Perennial Bulb”, singing, “I am in a cloud”, keys and drums pounding around him as he issues the album’s thesis statement: “My feet are bare. They hit the ground. I’m running toward the miracle.” This is the way down and the way up for the band, fire exploding in the sky behind them, toes tucked firmly into the dark soil, running toward a transfiguration. Far from being the fleeting perennial bulb or mercurial firework, Milagres instead fill Violent Light with richness and delicacy, channeling influences as diverse as Bowie, Peter Gabriel and Kate Bush, providing a durability of vision and influence that is as much born from the earth as it seeks to return to it.



The history of Milagres runs back more than a decade as Wilson performed under the name as a solo artist before moving to Brooklyn and eventually linking with current members Fraser McCulloch, Chris Brazee and new drummer, Paul Payabyab. In 2011, official debut Milagres record, Glowing Mouth, yielded a sight-unseen signing to Kill Rock Stars, national club and European festival touring, and inclusion on numerous year-end “Best of” lists for 2011 and 2012. Eponymous single, “Glowing Mouth” introduced audiences to Wilson’s brilliant falsetto hooks, as well as the band’s blinking, cold-medicine aesthetic. It was a fever dream, a fantasy world full of pitch and yaw, blurry edges and limitless possibility, choruses that erupted and hooks that stuck. Independent rock fans and press took note, as well as radio outlets KEXP and KCRW. Returning to the studio with McCulloch on production duties, Wilson and the band set out to expand and clarify the warm neon universe of Glowing Mouth.



Violent Light begins at the beginning. Wilson found inspiration for the record in the memories of childhood summers spent with his grandparents in Northern New Mexico. The caves, valleys and mesa burial grounds of the Pueblo Indians intermingled with Wilson’s conversations about atomic physics with his grandfather, a scientist on the Manhattan Project of the 1940s and the development of the hydrogen bomb in the 1950s. This mixture of twin organic compounds, the history of ancient people who made their lives in these caves in the earth and the lethal, brilliant modernity of the mid-20th century, unite and blur on Violent Light. When the recording for the album was complete, Wilson returned to visit his grandfather, an attempt to unify these visions, the scientist and the outdoorsmen poet. The conversation bore no fruit, and the listener is left only with the brilliant tension between these twin naturalisms on Violent Light. The stakes aren’t life and death, but how best to live in the shadow of modern fatalism, to wrestle with the meaning of the fire in the sky.



The album ranges across eras and soundscapes channeling psychedelica, dream pop and classic rock. Lead single, “Jeweled Cave” rides a winking Bowie hook, surging keyboard and syrupy backing vocals. Wilson insists in the tracer fire of the chorus, “We were in love” as the arrangement swirls around him. The stakes are in the sky on “Black Table” as Paul Payabyab’s insistent drumming backs an arrangement that easily could fit in the Peter Gabriel catalogue. Stand-out “Terrifying Sea” swells with immediacy, Wilson again drifting through a dangerous and elemental geography before pleading for connection, “I want nothing but you touching me.” Perhaps this is the “core of light” that Chris Brazee describes as lying at the center of these dark compositions. Even the bright, synthesizer-driven, “Sunburn” has Wilson wrestling between the earthly and the modern, “You felt real in a world of plastic, a bit of grit in a sterile place, I’ll be the bird flying up into the sunburn”, another of the album’s instantly memorable hooks. It is the Icarus problem, to have flown so high and burned our little wax wings: The caves of the Pueblo Indians dug into earth of the testing sites for the atomic bomb.



These tensions drive Milagres forward on Violent Light. Melodies and lyrics written partially in wanderings through Greenpoint and Williamsburg day and nightlife, Wilson and the band apply their unique democracy to fleshing out the arrangements that appear on the record. They take the listener into the belly of a remembered landscape, a meditation on the self and modernity as we have come to know and fear it. On final track, “Another Light”, Wilson sings, “When I was young I was afraid that I would never find a way home”, closing the record with, “I’m not afraid to die a natural death”, the final rest in the existential crisis. This is the atomic bomb, the ancient burial site, the melody hiding in the bar at the corner of Franklin and Manhattan Avenues. This, then, is the miracle, the bare feet and explosions of Violent Light, an intimate and ambitious record from a band with its toes on the ground and its eyes in the sky.
Mark Mulcahy
Mark Mulcahy
Mark is the former singer of Miracle Legion. That band lasted a long time and did great things. His next band was Polaris. They wrote the music for tv show 'The Adventures of Pete & Pete'. Polaris never really existed outside the television but there is an album. Mark's solo career began with Fathering - an album that received loads of praise and featured the song Hey Self Defeater, featured in Nick Hornby's 31 Songs. From there followed albums 'Smilesunset' and 'In Pursuit Of Your Happiness'. Some eps' and singles in there as well.

So many tours later he stopped everything and stayed home. Many of his long-time fans banded together to record an album of his songs in tribute to Mark's wife. The result was Ciao My Shining Star, featuring the likes (yes,the likes) of JM Stipe, T. Yorke, A. Yorke, Frank Black, Hayden, Ben Kweller, Josh Rouse, The Great Vic Chesnutt, Dinosaur Jr., Juliana Hatfield and The National. Lot's of other lovelies too. So many. Thanks everybody.

Mark has written several tragic comic operas with the cartoonist Ben Katchor. It's music played in front of projected cartoons. He likes bicycles, trolley cars and summertime. He likes his band too-Ken Maiuri (Pedro the Lion,Young at Heart Chorus) and Henning Ohlenbusch (School for the Dead).
'Dear Mark J Mulcahy I Love You' is the next and newest record. Now signed to Fire Records, Mark is back to making music and playing live. This, dear friend, is his first show in New York in a very long time. He has played the Mercury many times and loves it there. You can out more and more at mezzotint .com, or you can just ask him yourself.


Mark Mulcahy: In Pursuit Of Your Happiness

"his songs cast their spell long after the record's finished, scratching away at your subconscious until you go back of your own volition" 4 Stars - Observer Music Monthly


Mark Mulcahy: Fathering

"Mulcahy not only plays all the instruments but overlays his own vocal harmonies and counterparts in a set of emotionally involving, highly personal songs. Don't let the fact that Radiohead love him or that he's opened for Oasis and Seal confuse the issue: this man is very much a singer songwriter to be filed along side Tim Buckley, Neil Young or Jackson Browne." MOJO

"This rock-n-roll koala bear-same come-to-bed eyes, same don't mess-with-me claws-hasn't allowed over familiarity with the fuzzy end of rock's lollipop to dull his appreciation for the sensual world. Forbidden fruits are his specialty, the riper the better, and in that remarkable voice he has the instrument to skewer the loneliest hearts every time."NME
"LOCK UP YOUR GIRLFRIENDS!" Tom Cox

"He's a genius,' reckons Thom Yorke, and Fathering makes a good case for the Radiohead frontman being right." Jewish Chronicle
Palehound
Palehound
Palehound is the latest project from Yonkers, NY based singer/songwriter extraordinaire Ellen Kempner. Writing and performing her own songs since she was 10 years old, Kempner has played in bands and solo, developing a knack for songwriting in the process. Kempa's self-recorded "Dog on Crutches" was released early 2012, a collection of smart lo-fi indie rock and that sticks in your head. Late last year during her freshman year of college, Kempner decided to create a revolving band, and Palehound was born. Her debut "Bent Nail EP" is due out on October 22nd, 2013 via Exploding In Sound Records.
Slothrust
Slothrust
Formed amidst the ashes of Leah Wellbaum’s solo project, entitled Slothbox, Slothrust was forged with drummer Will Gorin and bassist Kyle Bann. Thanks to their adept jazz & blues backbone, Slothrust plays deceivingly clever rock with a relentless, punk-as-fuck aesthetic. Though commonly compared to Sonic Youth and Nirvana, Slothrust plays a trickier game than its grunge-revivalist peers. From tender to thrashing and from dark to dorky, Slothrust is a band at constant play with its sonic dynamics and emotional spectrum, yet still manages to weave in ear-worming, cathartic hooks. The band's second full-length release, Of Course You Do, was released in February 2014 on Ba Da Bing as a follow-up to their 2012 self-released album,Feels Your Pain.

With her deep, charismatic vocals, most reminiscent of Nico with the edge of Isaac Brock circa ‘97, Wellbaum sings about alienation, awkwardness and absurdity, and damn if she doesn’t make it all sound kind of fun. “Crockpot” is a dark, yet funny and irreverent take on the struggle for human connection in a society built to make us feel isolated: “Some men purchase real dolls / to fill the void / But she don’t finish dinner and her expression never changes / Don’t shake hands with the lonely kids ’cause I hear that shit’s contagious”. “Juice” is a paean to realizing the limits of self-improvement: “My name is Leah and I drink juice every morning when I wake up but it’s no use, I’m unwell”. She evokes feeling while sounding despondent, all the while with catchy melodies – pulling off Stephen Malkmus’ Pavement-era feats of writing and delivery. On top of the solid writing and rhythm section, her playing style ranges from simple eloquence to hard-edged, aggressive guitar solos.
Betty Who
Betty Who
Betty Who blends indie and pop music into an irresistible mix of bold soundscapes, Top 40 hooks, and knowing lyrics. Born and raised in Sydney, Australia, she played cello by age four and began writing her first pop songs in her early teens. Her voice is striking and memorable, and, according to Billboard, “shimmers with a self-assuredness extremely uncommon in an unsigned artist.”

Her recent debut EP “The Movement” was welcomed with rave reviews, including being crowned “Best EP of 2013” by both Billboard Magazine and Popjustice, being called “This Year’s Major One To Watch” by MTV Buzzworthy, and being called “The Artist Who Will Save Pop Music” by Idolator, with The Guardian, Digital Spy, Arjan Writes, Kick Kick Snare, All Things Go, Pop On And On, Jon Ali, and countless others chiming in with equal praise, as the EP soared to 250K+ streams and 70K song downloads.

She is currently working with producer Peter Thomas of Pulse Recordings on new material, and describes her artistic goal quite directly: “I’d just like to make people dance.”

For the rest of her story, just press “play”.
Simon Raymonde (DJ set)
Simon Raymonde (DJ set)
Most known as the Cocteau Twins' bassist from 1984 until their breakup, Simon Raymonde, the son of noted pop songwriter and arranger Ivor Raymonde, actually cut his teeth in Drowning Craze, a short-lived post-punk group on Situation Two that released a trio of singles before disbanding. After spending over a decade as a vital cog in the Cocteau Twins' machine, Raymonde and former bandmate Robin Guthrie set up the Bella Union label to release a number of records by like-minded acts. He also became increasingly active with production duties, twiddling knobs and providing guidance for Bella Union artists the Czarz, the Autumns, Lift to Experience, and Rothko, as well as the late Billy Mackenzie. Raymonde has worked sporadically with his own musical ventures; he wrote, produced, and played a number of instruments for Nanaco's late-'90s recordings and released the solo record Blame Someone Else in 1997 on Bella Union.
Venue Information:
Rough Trade NYC
64 N 9th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11249