Suuns, Disappears

Suuns

Disappears

Christines

Sat, February 28, 2015

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Rough Trade NYC

Brooklyn, NY

$15 advance / $17 day of show

This event is 21 and over

Suuns
Suuns
Montreal’s Suuns possess a rare trait in rock music: restraint. They use it like an instrument, which makes their debut full-length Zeroes QC as unsettling as it is wonderfully exasperating. It’s immediately apparent in album opener “Armed for Peace,” a track that starts off like a robot breaking down in a hot desert; the song’s mechanic beat plods like iron-shoed footsteps as the melody of a wheezing synth mirrors the crackling sound of old transistors and circuitry being cooked in the sun. It’s deceptively lulling, the tension almost unnoticeably wrenching up and up until the track unexpectedly opens into a barrage of nose-diving guitar riffs and crashing drums – yet the band still stays locked on the song’s linear, forward-motion direction. Suuns were born during the summer of 2006 when vocalist/guitarist Ben Shemie and guitarist/bassist Joe Yarmush got together to make some beats which quickly evolved into a few songs. The duo were soon joined by drummer Liam O’Neill and bassist/keyboardist Max Henry to complete the line-up. “I don’t think we were really a ‘band’ for the first year,” Ben surmises. It wasn’t until a friend helped them procure a spot at Pop Montreal 2007 that he says the group played their first “real gig.”

Last year, Suuns entered Breakglass Studios with Jace Lasek of the Besnard Lakes co-producing and engineering, and recorded their first album. The group wanted to create something that couldn’t be pigeonholed as simply indie rock. “Jace definitely had a huge impact for bringing to life the big sound of the band and being open and willing stretch out any idea we or he had,” Ben explains.

The resulting Zeroes QC is a warm yet dark, propulsive collusion of pop, post-punk and experimental rock – one that allows the group to musically shapeshift without losing any of the sense of tension and unease that runs throughout the record. During tracks like “Gaze,” tightly wound guitars and bass ring and buzz atop Liam’s metronomic, powerhouse drumming, with Ben’s cool, detached vocals acting as a nervy counterweight as he delivers falsely assuring lines like, “Don’t you be yourself, you are someone else.” Often his close-miced sing/speak is as metronomic as it is melodic; in “Arena” Ben’s rhythmic “What-choo, what-choo”’s are reminiscent of Suicide’s Alan Vega as he leads the band’s death disco groove into a bloodbath of razor-sharp guitars, while his icy, hushed delivery in “Sweet Nothing” is almost as motorik as the song itself. Most impressive, though, is how Suuns effortlessly sculpt memorable pop songs from experimental building blocks, frequently using noise and space as actual hooks. All of this amounts to a great first album – one that is as timeless as it is thrillingly modern.
Disappears
Disappears
Irreal, the fifth long player from Chicago's Disappears, is another trip down the rabbit hole. This time the album plays out as a dream sequence – hazed dub landscapes give way to the bands most experimental and open music yet. If their last album Era confirmed the fact that Disappears are on their own trip then Irreal is where it kicks in. Eternalism, roboethics, identity – it's a Ballardian mix of imperfect melodies, half thoughts and good ol' dystopian modernity. Produced by John Congleton at famed Chicago recording institution Electrical Audio, Irreal sits in the negative space where art rock and post punk collapse onto each other. It's the sound of Disappears reporting back from The Void.
Christines
Christines
Christines is a cathartic response to the routine and spectacle of the city. It’s the physical sense of void getting off the last transfer of a three-train daily transit, not recalling a particular step of the whole trip—the result of an acquired subconscious meditation traversing you through subway line and city grid. It’s the routine that fuels the spectacle of the city, and the response to the realization that this spectacle, in turn, dictates the routine. It’s the soundtrack and drone to this repetition—a carefully selected set of records with a sound and drive that propels and envelops the senses. It’s the wall of sound, intertwining melodies, and the rhythm that always seem to lock with your footsteps, tempting you to just keep drifting, wandering the grid.

The group is comprised of the collaborative efforts of Andrew Burr, Matthew Yu, Jordan Parker, and Cory Race. Andrew formerly fronted the Austin, Texas band Woven Bones before moving to New York, and Cory was formerly the drummer for Troubleman Unlimited’s Kent, Ohio-based The Party of Helicopters.

The genesis of the band was fed from a love of the more raw immediacy of records like My Bloody Valentine’s Isn’t Anything and Feed Me with Your Kiss EPs, as well as Unwound’s swirling guitar work on Leaves Turn Inside You and Repetition. A heavy dosage of Master of Reality to Sabotage era Sabbath, Guided by Voices, and an obsessive love of 13th Floor Elevators' Bull of the Woods also helped form the mold. Heavy highs and lows, the tingling hairs on the ends of guitar fuzz, intricate guitar leads, and a driving rhythm section are the core elements that define Christines' approach.
Venue Information:
Rough Trade NYC
64 N 9th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11249