Protomartyr, Omni, Lemon Twigs, DRINKS, Yoko and the Oh No's, Mothers, Car Seat Headrest, Modern Vices

CMJ: Aquarium Drunkard Presents: No Jacket Required

Protomartyr, Omni, Lemon Twigs, DRINKS, Yoko and the Oh No's, Mothers, Car Seat Headrest, Modern Vices

Chances With Wolves (DJ Set)

Fri, October 16, 2015

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

Rough Trade NYC

Brooklyn, NY

$12

This event is 21 and over

Protomartyr
Protomartyr
Protomartyr – Relatives In Descent

After a year of extensive touring in support of 2015’s The Agent Intellect, Protomartyr returned to their practice space in a former optician's office in Southwest Detroit. Guitarist Greg Ahee—inspired by The Raincoats' Odyshape, Mica Levi's orchestral compositions, and Protomartyr's recent collaboration with post-punk legends The Pop Group, for Rough Trade's 40th anniversary—began writing new music that artfully expanded on everything they’d recorded up until that point. The result is Relatives in Descent, their fourth full-length and Domino debut. Though not a concept album, it presents twelve variations on a theme: the unknowable nature of truth, and the existential dread that often accompanies that unknowing. This, at a moment when disinformation and garbled newspeak have become a daily reality.

“I used to think that truth was something that existed, that there were certain shared truths, like beauty,” says singer Joe Casey. “Now that’s being eroded. People have never been more skeptical, and there’s no shared reality. Maybe there never was.”

Relatives in Descent offers new layers and new insights, without sanding any of the edges born from their days as a Detroit bar band. Ahee’s guitar still crackles and spits electricity. Casey's voice continues to shift naturally between dead-eyed croon and fevered bark. Drummer Alex Leonard and bassist Scott Davidson remain sharp and propulsive, a rhythm section that’s as agile as it is adventurous. But this is also Protomartyr at their most impressive. After months of rehearsal, the band decamped to Los Angeles, California for two weeks in March of 2017, to record at 64Sound in Highland Park. Co-produced and recorded with Sonny DiPerri (Animal Collective, Dirty Projectors), who helped capture the band’s long-simmering vision for something more complex, but no less visceral, Relatives in Descent also features contributions from violinist Tyler Karmen and additional synths by Cheveu’s Olivier Demeaux.

It all begins with "A Private Understanding,” pegged as the album's opening statement the second it was finished, and a wellspring from which the following eleven songs flow. At once beautiful and brutal, it mutates from drum-led oddity to unlikely anthem, with some of Casey’s most potent lyrical work at its center: “Sorrow's the wind blowing through/Truth is hiding in the wire.” He’d originally approached the writing on this album as an opportunity to move away from the anger and personal despair that defined much of Protomartyr’s previous three albums. But a lot has happened in the past two years. Disturbed by happenings both local (the ongoing, man-made tragedy of the Flint water crisis) and national (just about everything), Casey drew influence from the songwriting of Ben Wallers, the recently translated stories of Irish writer Máirtín Ó Cadhain, and Robert Burton’s The Anatomy of Melancholy, a sprawling, 17th century masterwork that provided both solace and confirmation.

One can hear these influences throughout, be it in the wary reportage of “Here Is The Thing” or the uncanny menace of "Windsor Hum", the shining city of "Don't Go To Anacita” or the triptych of delusions both "good" and "bad" that is "Up The Tower", "Night-Blooming Cereus", and "Male Plague". In the end, Relatives in Descent offers a small light in the darkness, while never denying that we are all just standing in the dark.
OMNI
OMNI
Omni – the band, not the hotel – are from the former home of the Braves: Atlanta. Playing lo-fi pop that channels the specter of the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, Omni brings you back to an era where any sane person was reeling from the unfulfilled promise of the Space Age and Age of Aquarius bleeding into the looming threat of “Morning in America.”

Omni distills the buzz and grit that snakes through the best of Television, Devo, and Pylon into surprisingly danceable, hook-laden slabs of raw, angular, sonic bliss. It’s still the summer of ’78, and pushing the roots of rock & roll to its limits remains in vogue. “Deluxe” serves as a fresh reminder that rock music can work outside of blues rooted, formulaic progressions without playing it safe behind a wall of effects.

Arty enough to impress record enthusiasts, yet melodically attractive enough to transcend to those who’ve never asked: “’Sister Midnight’ or ‘Red Money’?”
The Lemon Twigs
The Lemon Twigs
Once or twice every generation, Long Island introduces the world to artists of such singular originality that they change the very nature of their art: Lou Reed; Jim Brown; Robert Mapplethorpe; Andy Kaufman. With their debut album for 4AD, ‘Do Hollywood,’ The Lemon Twigs have earned themselves a spot on that list.

Fusing tightly constructed pop, sophisticated orchestration, and British invasion melodies into a ten-song masterpiece, the D’Addario brothers—Brian (19) and Michael (17)—are whipping fans and critics alike into an utter frenzy. NPR hailed them as “fabulously weird,” Brooklyn Vegan raved that “they need to be seen to be believed,” and The Line Of Best Fit dubbed their music “near perfect…the best lo-fi rock & roll anthem you’ll hear this decade.” The Guardian, meanwhile, crowned the album “a triumph of detailed richness and sumptuous melody.”

Born into a musical family, Brian and Michael grew up on The Beach Boys and The Beatles, whose albums and films played constantly in their house. As toddlers, they were already harmonizing on “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” and soon they were playing drums and mastering whatever instruments they could get their hands on. Ask about their childhood dreams and they’ll tell you that they never aspired to do anything but make music together. It shows.

“Brian and Michael are two of the best musicians I’ve ever met,” says Foxygen’s Jonathan Rado, who discovered the duo via Twitter and produced the new album. “As teenagers, they work like studio vets. Brian can play anything you hand him –¬ he played all the strings and horns on the record – and Michael is the most captivating drummer I’ve ever seen. There’s nothing they can’t do.”

Rado proved to be the perfect foil for the wunderkinds, and the resulting album brings together everything from Brian Wilson and David Bowie to Queen and The Association. Their music can soar like a carnival calliope and then swiftly drop down to its knees in the hushed tones of a confessional booth. Their vocals move seamlessly from a cabaret croon to classic la-la-la harmonies. They mine inspiration seemingly from every era of rock, stitching it all together into a baroque-pop quilt of many colors.

It’s an ambitious approach, to say the least, but the album lives up to the hype. ‘Do Hollywood’ opens, appropriately enough, with “I Wanna Prove To You,” which parades out of the gate like a circus arriving into to town. “I wanna prove to you what I can do,” Brian sings as he and his brother proceed to do just that. Bouncing piano and dense harmonies give way to shifting time signatures and mind-bending arrangements. It’s the perfect introduction to The Lemon Twigs, and to ‘Do Hollywood,’ which features the brothers alternating writing credits on each track and liberally swapping instruments, just as they do in their electrifying live performances (they tour with live members Megan Zeankowski on bass and Danny Ayala on keyboards).

Lead single “These Words” builds from a delicate whisper to a rock and roll roar, while “How Lucky Am I?” tugs at the heartstrings, and “As Long As We’re Together” calls to mind the memorable melodies of Big Star and T-Rex. Perhaps no song demonstrates their brotherly democracy better than “Hi+Lo,” the track unfolding in movements like something off of Abbey Road’s Side B medley with Michael singing and playing guitar, drums, and bass, and Brian adding horns and strings to flesh out the orchestral atmosphere.

“We were crafting these songs pretty intricately,” Brian says. “There’s a lot of care in the arrangements. They’re built to get at people who like nice pop songs. But they’re not empty. We put a lot of ourselves into it and the album has a lot of substance.”

It was that substance that caught the attention of the iconic 4AD label and has already earned the band dates with other critical darlings like Foxygen and Car Seat Headrest. With high profile tours and their label debut on the horizon, it’s only a matter of time until the rest of the world discovers Long Island’s next great cultural contribution. Get ready to ‘Do Hollywood.’ It’s time to meet The Lemon Twigs.
Drinks
Drinks
"Tim, do I like that dog?" A strange question, a queer query, an odd ask. The answer surely already known unless one mind knows the other. Which would appear to be the case with Cate and Tim. With Tim and Cate. Cate, born in West Wales, raised under the shadow of a woolen mill, dressed by the field and by the rain. Tim, from San Francisco, grew under and over the bridges and streets, combed by corners and by concrete. A more different musical upbringing you couldn't dream up. One a black thread strung through the eye of American hardcore, she a shard of glass tapped through a solid wall. Loop the thread around the shard and you have pendular device for predicting the sex. Will it be a boy or a girl? They both like to drink, coffee mostly and sometimes each other. And once the drinks are drunk out it comes. The mud slicks and the plates click. Drinks is a solo project, not a collaboration. It has one mouth, one set of lungs, one mind and four legs. Drinks are the sound of hermits on holiday, having the time of each others lives.
Yoko and the Oh No's
Yoko and the Oh No's
Yoko & the Oh No’s are three kids from Chicago – Max Goldstein on vocals, Max Loebman on guitar, and Stef Roti on drums – a raging trio fueled by Taco Bell, rock & roll myths, and pilfered booze. It doesn’t quite add up how kids this young (Max L. just graduated high school) managed to tap into a vibe this classic. The band’s self-titled full-length debut, out September 11th on Autumn Tone, is crammed with classic rock riffs, swinging beats, and up front, the sassy, done-up style of Max G. emoting loosely and widly like a young David Johansen fronting the New York Dolls, possessing a crooner’s voice and a taste for style. Dolled up in flashy get-ups, Max G.’s voice is a growly, beefy thing, a rangy tenor that belies his taste for soul shouters. The prevailing mood in modern indie garage rock is one of stylistic indifference, but that’s not how Yoko & the Oh No’s come across; these kiddos don’t just care, they care a lot. Listen to the crashing classic rock chorus of “Heart Attack,” the sneering “She Knows It,” and the distorted R&B groove of “Nobody Wants to Know.” “Talking over radio/on the moonlit drive/We listen to VU/Jane says close your eyes.”

Yoko & the Oh No’s S/T album is their first for Autumn Tone Records, which has a knack for finding raw young bucks (turn up records by the Orwells, Twin Peaks, and Modern Vices as a testament). Yoko & the Oh No’s are currently on tour with likeminded rock & roll weirdos The Growlers, blowing minds and connecting with crowds across the Midwest.
Mothers
Mothers
Mothers began in 2013 as the solo project of Athens, Georgia-based visual artist Kristine Leschper while she studied printmaking at the Lamar Dodd School of Art. Now a quartet, their debut album 'When You Walk A Long Distance You Are Tired,' released via Grand Jury Music and Wichita Recordings, has earned the young band high praise from the press, including from NPR Music ('First Listen'), The New York Times, Pitchfork, The Guardian, NME ('Radar'), and Q Magazine, among many others, while the band themselves have been included on numerous ‘Musicians to know’ lists for 2016 including from Stereogum, Vulture, Spotify, Paper Magazine and others. Comprised of eight original songs - the majority of which were written while Leschper was finishing art school in early 2014 - Mothers’ debut LP is an introduction to the foundations of the young band, a snapshot of a particular period of their genesis that maps both where they began and where they are heading.
Car Seat Headrest
Car Seat Headrest
Matador Records is thrilled to announce that it has signed Car Seat Headrest and will release Teens of Style on October 30, with Teens of Denial to follow soon after in 2016. This prolific artist (n Will Toledo) comes to Matador having already crafted an 11-album catalog of staggering depth, all self-released on Bandcamp, which has gained him an obsessive following and over 25,000 downloads - all without the muscle of a manager, label, agent, or publicist - until now.

Car Seat Headrest began in 2010 in Will Toledo's hometown of Leesburg, Virginia. Needing a place of solitude (and soundproofing) where he could record vocals undisturbed, a 17-year-old Toledo set up shop in the family car. Toledo's catalogue is sharp, literary, and culturally omnivorous as it touches upon youth and death, love and depression, drunken parties and 2nd century theologians. Ever surprising, his lyrical imagery ranges from playful to sexually frank to sorrowful, often within the same song.

After relocating to the Seattle suburbs in 2014, Toledo assembled a lineup with bassist Ethan Ives and drummer Andrew Katz. Teens of Style is the first Car Seat Headrest album recorded with a full band, and the sound is vibrant and powerful, with a wide stylistic range.

On Teens of Style, Toledo has taken material from the first three years of the band's existence and reworked it to generate some of the most realized arrangements to date. Drawing material from 3 (2010), My Back Is Killing Me Baby (2011), and Monomania (2012), Teens of Style provides a concise overview of the band's many sonic and emotional facets, with the songs ranging from electronic psychedelia to punky anthems to melancholic acoustic numbers.

The longest track on Teens of Style, "Times to Die," is just under seven minutes, applying breakbeat cut-ups and "Low Rider" horns to a groove-driven neo-psych jam with lyrics about Judaism, Hinduism, and the record business. Similarly, "Maud Gone" is a wistful 60s-inspired pop number paying homage to Yeats's unrequited love, while the intricate party track "Los Borrachos" borrows its title from the Diego Velasquez painting.

Car Seat Headrest's conceptual ambition and stunning songwriting has been apparent since its early days of laptop recording, the scale of Toledo's vision going far beyond the constricting "lo-fi" term. Now on his Matador Records debut, Teens of Style, we witness Toledo presenting his intricate ideas with more clarity and refinement than ever, delivering an enthralling collection of songs destined for wide acclaim.
Modern Vices
Modern Vices
Self-proclaimed dirty doo-wop, Modern Vices are Alex, Peter, Thomas, Patrick, and Miles. They hail from Chicago. Noir in tone, their sound resides somewhere between late '50s croon and wet garage rock snarl. Their self-recorded, eponymous, LP drops in September via Los Angeles' Autumn Tone Records. A romantic revolution.
Chances With Wolves (DJ Set)
Our mission is to play the joints. Those songs which are haunting or beautiful or hauntingly beautiful or in someway beautifully haunting. An internety, radio-esque, show-like experience with your hosts Kray (of the Famous Rap group Iller Than Theirs), Visual artist, grand character, and all around junkman Kenan Juska (a/k/a DJ Kool Kear), and the infamous DJ Mikey Palms ( One of the founding fathers of Brooklyn's Southpaw music venue). Most of the songs are going to be mad old. But some of them wont.

Check out Chances With Wolves on East Village Radio Mondays from 4-6pm.
Venue Information:
Rough Trade NYC
64 N 9th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11249
rs